Format:
Book
Author:
Title:
Publisher, Date:
New York : Dial Books for Young Readers, 2013.
Description:
319 p. ; 22 cm.
Summary:
Conor O'Neill faces his cowardice and visits the underworld to bargain with the Lady who can prevent the imminent death of a family member, but first Ashling, the banshee who brought the news, wants to visit his middle school.
Subjects:
LCCN:
2012032488
ISBN:
9780803737044 (hardcover : alk. paper)
0803737041 (hardcover : alk. paper)
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Brief Descriptions

Conor O'Neill faces his cowardice and visits the underworld to bargain with the Lady who can prevent the imminent death of a family member, but first Ashling, the banshee who brought the news, wants to visit his middle school. - (Baker & Taylor)

When a death-forecasting banshee named Ashling appears in his bedroom, Conor O'Neill is forced to overcome his fearful nature to visit the underworld and bargain with the Lady to prevent a family death, a quest that is complicated by eccentric helpers and Ashling's resolve to attend middle school. - (Baker & Taylor)

Perpetual scaredy-cat Conor O'Neill has the fright of his life when a banshee girl named Ashling shows up in his bedroom. Ashling is--as all banshees are--a harbinger of death, but she's new at this banshee business, and first she insists on going to middle school. As Conor attempts to hide her identity from his teachers, he realizes he's going to have to pay a visit to the underworld if he wants to keep his family safe.

"Got your cell?"
"Yeah . . . . Don't see what good it'll do me."
"I'll text you if anything happens that you should know."
"Text me? Javier, we'll be in the afterlife."
"You never know. Maybe they get a signal."


Discover why Kirkus has called Booraem's work "utterly original American fantasy . . . frequently hysterical." This totally fresh take on the afterlife combines the kid next door appeal of Percy Jackson with the snark of Artemis Fowl and the heart of a true middle grade classic.
- (Penguin Putnam)

Perpetual scaredy-cat Conor O'Neill has the fright of his life when a banshee girl named Ashling shows up in his bedroom. Ashling is--as all banshees are--a harbinger of death, but she's new at this banshee business, and first she insists on going to middle school. As Conor attempts to hide her identity from his teachers, he realizes he's going to have to pay a visit to the underworld if he wants to keep his family safe.

"Got your cell?"
"Yeah . . . . Don't see what good it'll do me."
"I'll text you if anything happens that you should know."
"Text me? Javier, we'll be in the afterlife."
"You never know. Maybe they get a signal."


Discover why Kirkus has called Booraem's work "utterly original American fantasy . . . frequently hysterical." This totally fresh take on the afterlife combines the kid next door appeal of Percy Jackson with the snark of Artemis Fowl and the heart of a true middle grade classic. - (Random House, Inc.)

Author Biography

Ellen Booraem, a native of Massachusetts, now lives in Downeast Maine. She is the author of The Unnameables (an ALA Best Book for Young Adults), Small Persons With Wings, and Texting the Underworld. All of Ellen's books have, among other awards, been picked as Best Books of the Year by Kirkus Reviews. In addition to being a writer, Ellen is also a mentor and a writing coach. She lives with a cat, a dog, and an artist in a house they (meaning the humans) built with their own hands.
- (Penguin Putnam)

Ellen Booraem, a native of Massachusetts, now lives in Downeast Maine. She is the author ofThe Unnameables (an ALA Best Book for Young Adults), Small Persons With Wings, andTexting the Underworld. All of Ellen's books have, among other awards, been picked as Best Books of the Year byKirkus Reviews. In addition to being a writer, Ellen is also a mentor and a writing coach. She lives with a cat, a dog, and an artist in a house they (meaning the humans) built with their own hands. - (Random House, Inc.)

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly Reviews

As Booraem did in Small Persons with Wings, she uses mythological creatures (in this case, banshees) to tell a story that packs an emotional wallop. Conor O'Neill is a smart but timid seventh-grader, afraid of spiders, sneaking out, and leaving his Southie neighborhood to go to Boston Latin School. When a banshee straight out of his Irish-born grandfather's stories appears in Conor's room, he's terrified that someone he loves is going to die soon. The banshee, Ashling, is new at her job, and she doesn't know who will die or when. Since her mortal life ended hundreds of years ago with an ax to the head, she's curious about the present day, and she masquerades as a new student at Conor's school (armed mainly with knowledge obtained from outdated Trivial Pursuit cards). Eventually Conor, his sister, and his friend Javier realize they'll have to confront the possibility of death head-on. In an affecting, funny, and provocative story, Booraem balances the seriousness of a novel about death spirits and finding courage with Ashling's comical interactions with the modern world. Ages 10–up. Agent: Kate Schafer Testerman, kt literary. (Aug.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC

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2013

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