Format:
Book
Author:
Title:
Edition:
1st paperback ed.
Publisher, Date:
New York : Little, Brown and Company, 2009, c2007.
Description:
[230], 29 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Summary:
Budding cartoonist Junior leaves his troubled school on the Spokane Indian Reservation to attend an all-white farm town school where the only other Indian is the school mascot.
Subjects:
Other Author:
Notes:
Includes a preview of Radioactive love song a forthcoming novel.
Includes author discussion guide and interview with illustrator Ellen Forney.
National Book Award winner.
ISBN:
9780316013697 (pbk.)
0316013692 (pbk.)
Other Number:
317359051
Copies in all libraries:
2
Current Holds:
0
# Local items:
0
Control Number:
1026493
# Local items in:
0
# System items in:
1
Where is it?
Map It
Brief Descriptions
Author Biography
Large Cover Image
Reviews Via Publishers Weekly

Publishers Weekly Reviews

Screenwriter, novelist and poet, Alexie bounds into YA with what might be a Native American equivalent of Angela's Ashes, a coming-of-age story so well observed that its very rootedness in one specific culture is also what lends it universality, and so emotionally honest that the humor almost always proves painful. Presented as the diary of hydrocephalic 14-year-old cartoonist and Spokane Indian Arnold Spirit Jr., the novel revolves around Junior's desperate hope of escaping the reservation. As he says of his drawings, "I think the world is a series of broken dams and floods, and my cartoons are tiny little lifeboats." He transfers to a public school 22 miles away in a rich farm town where the only other Indian is the team mascot. Although his parents support his decision, everyone else on the rez sees him as a traitor, an apple ("red on the outside and white on the inside"), while at school most teachers and students project stereotypes onto him: "I was half Indian in one place and half white in the other." Readers begin to understand Junior's determination as, over the course of the school year, alcoholism and self-destructive behaviors lead to the deaths of close relatives. Unlike protagonists in many YA novels who reclaim or retain ethnic ties in order to find their true selves, Junior must separate from his tribe in order to preserve his identity. Jazzy syntax and Forney's witty cartoons examining Indian versus White attire and behavior transmute despair into dark humor; Alexie's no-holds-barred jokes have the effect of throwing the seriousness of his themes into high relief. Ages 14-up. (Sept.)

[Page 70]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

Librarian's View
Book
2009

Add to My List  
Check out our new titles!  
New York Times Bestsellers  
Teen Reads - DPL  
New! 3M eAudios at Derry  
Derry Staff Picks  
Read-Alikes  
Foreign Films Collection